NYT front page article on the work of the National Solidarity Program

November 13, 2009

The New York Times cover story today is about the work of the National Solidarity Program (NSP).  While in Afghanistan I spent days filming the impact of NSP in the Kapisa province.  The work of NSP is at the center of the story we are highlighting in Brewing Tea in a Kettle of War.

The article does not fully capture the national impact of the NSP.  Many consider the NSP the most effective economic and social development work in Afghanistan. Since 2003 the NSP has funded 46,000 development projects in 27,000 villages. Elected community councils determine the reconstruction work. Ten percent is paid for by local labor and the average grant is $24,000.   The film will show that supporting this kind of slower, more sustainable long-term and locally led development work may be a more successful path to stability in Afghanistan and western security.

I hope you can take a moment to read this important article and to forward it to friends and colleagues as an example of the positive hard work that Afghans and the Afghan government are doing.

New York Times: An Afghan Development Model: Small is Better

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2 Comments

  1. Barbara

    This is a very troubling story about our government aid, yet an encouraging story about small efforts. I remember being in Burkina Faso where we’d see Chevy trucks abandoned because of the lack of spare parts.

    Your pictures are very descriptive. I love the people, expressions, food. The striking colors contrasting with the bleak surroundings in the dry areas. The military high tech gear and the local poeple moving on bicycles and on foot. A country of challenges and contrasts.

    Thank you for the photo essays.

    Reply
  2. Claire

    Michael,

    I’m enjoying your photos of the “real” Afghanistan. I’ll look forward to hearing and seeing more of the project!

    Reply

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