Winona Daily News: New Immigrant and Refugee Visions Film Screening Set for Thursday

September 17, 2019

New Immigrant and Refugee Visions Film Screening Set for Thursday

Winona Daily News, September 16, 2019

Project FINE and the Frozen River Film Festival are hosting a film screening from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 19, at the Winona County History Center at 160 Johnson St.

The screening will include four films and a discussion about how we can work together to build a welcoming community.  Light refreshments will be provided.

New Immigrant and Refugee Visions is a collection of short films developed by Community Supported Film by and about immigrants that provide a unique insider perspective on the integration challenges they face and the contributions they make to our culture, economy and social fabric.

Project FINE is a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating a respectful and sensitive community.  This film screening is part of their annual celebration of Welcoming Week, which brings together immigrants, refugees and long-time residents in a spirit of unity to build strong connections across the community and affirm the benefits of welcoming everyone – including new Americans.

Frozen River Film Festival is Minnesota’s only all-documentary film festival.  Now in its 15th year, FRFF presents more than 80 films annually during the festival weekend (Feb. 5-9, 2020), brings in filmmakers from around the world, and works with students on the documentary film-making process. To learn more visit www.frozenriver.org.

View excerpts from all the films.

Organize a Screening of the New Immigrant and Refugee Vision films in your community.

Related Posts:

ON MIGRATION | Change the Narrative, Change the World: The Power of Immigrant Representation on Television

ON MIGRATION | Change the Narrative, Change the World: The Power of Immigrant Representation on Television

Define American, with USC Norman Lear Center’s Media Impact Project, presents our third television impact study.

We looked at the portrayal of immigrant characters on 79 scripted television shows that aired between July 2020 and June 2022 and surveyed viewers on how four immigration storylines shaped their attitudes toward immigrants in the real world.

The findings? Immigrant representation on television has shifted in important ways — both positive and negative — since 2020.

ON DEVELOPMENT | Soaring humanitarian costs in 2023, The New Humanitarian

ON DEVELOPMENT | Soaring humanitarian costs in 2023, The New Humanitarian

More hunger, more displacement, more people in crisis, and a soaring price tag: Humanitarian needs and costs will once again shatter records in 2023, but available funding – and the system itself – isn’t keeping pace.

Source: Soaring humanitarian costs in 2023: Key takeaways, The New Humanitarian, by Irwin Loy and Jessica Alexander, December 1, 2022

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *