Taliban Prime Minister orders marriage for all women over 20 and widows under 35

September 23, 2021

The Prime Minister of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, Mawlawi Mohammad Hasan Akhund, has announced the following rules for women according to Shariah law:

Article 1: To strengthen Islamic values all girls over age 20 must get married. All widows under age 35 must get married to a Taliban mujahideen.


Article 2: All parents must marry their daughters who are over the age of 18 before they start university so that they can be accompanied to the school by their husband or other male family member.

Article 3: For the protection of Islamic values and access to women’s rights according to Islam, all women who were working in government offices are to stay at home until we decide how they can be at work safely.

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