Documentary Storytelling Workshop

May 5, 2021

Discover your identity as a storyteller and focus on the stories that matter most to you and that you can best tell. Learn how to successfully structure compelling narratives with a scene-based, character-driven approach. With this hands-on course, you will also learn how to avoid the pitfalls of stories that tell rather than show, that leave your viewer passive rather than engaged.

Through a dynamic combination of in-class presentations, technique-building exercises, and informative discussions, you will experience the process of researching, developing, planning, structuring, and scripting a story for production. We will explore the various genres of documentary filmmaking and see how stories evolve through the stages of pre-production, production, and post-production.

Equipment Requirements: None


6 Sessions: Tuesdays, May 25 – June 29,  6–8pm, Online via Zoom

Taught by Michael Sheridan, filmmaker and educator; director of Community Supported Film and SheridanWorks.

Sign up at MassArt Continuing Education, $360

Check out examples of student work.

Please be in touch with any questions.


Also see:


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