CSFilm & NIRV featured on BNN TV News

April 3, 2019

Immigrants Tell Their Stories in Films

by Chris Lovett, March 12, 2019, BNN Neighborhood Network News

Chris Lovett (Host, Neighborhood Network News): Immigrants come from many countries around the world but their stories happen in places like Boston. To record that experience ensure it with a larger audience a locally-based nonprofit has been training immigrants to produce 10 documentary films. These will premiere at the Boston Public Library on March 31st and April 1st. To tell us about the project is the founder and director of Community Supported Film, Michael Sheridan. Thank you very much being with us Michael.

Michael Sheridan: Thank you.

CL: There are lots of films, even Hollywood films, about immigrants so why do we need films like these?

MS: Well I think the unique thing about these films is that they’re by and about immigrants and refugees. Community Supported Film is really interested in strengthening the makers as people from the community. They are immigrants living in communities in and around Boston. They are most of them very new immigrants, within the last two years, and they bring an access and a perspective that’s really fresh and different.

The interview features clips from four of the ten New Immigrant and Refugee Visions films.

View excerpts from all the films.

Attend the premiere events at the Boston Public Library, March 31 and April 1, 2019.

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