New Immigrants and Refugees Apply Now for FREE Documentary Filmmaking Training and Production, Boston

May 8, 2017

New Immigrant and Refugee Visions

APPLICATION DEADLINE: CLOSED

Download, Print and Share: NIRV – Call for Applicants – Poster and Details (2-pages, print front and back on single page for distribution)

  • Get Trained in Documentary Filmmaking: Community Supported Film is looking for ten new immigrants and refugees from the Boston area to learn documentary filmmaking.
  • Make a Film: Each participant will produce his or her own short film about the challenges faced or the contributions made by their community.
  • Share Your Story: Your films will be screened across the country to inform public opinion and influence decision-makers about the experience of new immigrants and refugees.

Qualifications:

  1. New immigrant or refugee in Greater Boston, 18 years and older, who has ideally been in the US for <10 years;
  2. Conversational English;
  3. Previous experience with any form of storytelling, such as theater, fiction or non-fiction writing, print, radio, photo, video or other journalism in the US or country of origin. No previous filmmaking experience required;
  4. Involvement in your community’s economic or social issues. Your experience can be professional or voluntary;
  5. Ability to use what you learn from the training in your ongoing community or professional work. The training does not intend to produce filmmakers who can make their living solely from documentary filmmaking, but will provide usable and employable skills for continued community activism or employment;
  6. Comfort working with people coming from many different cultures, religions and backgrounds;
  7. Excellent work ethic and a good sense of humor. This will be a demanding training and require a great deal of hard work, self-initiative and attention to detail.

Time Commitment:

  1. Fifteen weeks: classes will be held Saturdays, 9-5, and one weekday evening per week, 6-10.
  2. 5+ hours of work out of class to do your weekly filmmaking exercises and to make your final short-film.

Schedule:

  • July 29th – November 18th, 2017; All Saturdays except 9/2 and 10/7; Plus one weekday evening per week, 6-9pm

Expenses Covered:

  1. Transportation
  2. Lunch on days of training
  3. Equipment and production resources provided.

Apply by sending the following:

  1. Letter explaining your interests, qualifications and availability based on the above information
  2. Resume
  3. Three community or professional references including: name, email, phone and the nature of your relationship
  4. Online links or physical documentation of previous storytelling work – if available

Please email us  at info [at] csfilm dot org with the subject line: “Applicant: NIRV Trainee.”  – or –  Mail your application to Community Supported Film, 31 Lenox Street, Boston, MA 02118.

Application Deadlines and Process

  • Currently                            Applicant interviews are being held
  • July 29                                Training begins, Saturdays and one evening
  • Nov. 18                                 Training ends, 10 short films completed

About Community Supported Film (CSFilm)

CSFilm trains women and men in under-represented communities to use documentary filmmaking to produce stories about their economic and social realities. The local perspectives captured in their films are used in screen and discuss campaigns to influence public policy and opinion. Go to www.csfilm.org/projects to see the results of previous CSFilm training, production and public engagement projects in Afghanistan and Haiti.

Questions? Please call or email us at +1 (857) 415-0564 or info [at] csfilm dot org.

Download, Print and ShareNIRV – 2 Page Poster & Details 
(2-pages, print front and back on single page for distribution)

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