Afghanistan: Kabul Program Highlighted in AWWP Documentary

September 3, 2014

Read the original post on the AWWP Summer 2014 Newsletter.

Kabul Program Highlighted in AWWP Documentary, Alex Footman Films AWWP Workshop in Kabul

Documentary filmmaker Alex Footman completed a short film highlighting the work of the Afghan Women’s Writing Project in Kabul. Footman, along with his production assistant, Ellie Kealey, has done several projects in Afghanistan, using his filmmaking expertise to connect people to one another by sharing the wealth of stories he finds in his travels.

The documentary will be available on Vimeo through August. After that, it will be available for use at AWWP events. To access the video now, visit AWWP’s Vimeo Page — let us know what you think!

To learn more about AWWP check out their website here: http://awwproject.org/

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