Socio-Economic Reintegration and Livelihoods

April 27, 2012

During the last decade, the Afghan government and international community worked to promote peace, governance, security and development in Afghanistan. However, as discussed in a report entitled “Talking about Talks: Toward a Political Settlement in Afghanistan” from the International Crisis Group, the current situation is still fragile and volatile. A recent article in The Independent adds that insurgency hampers service delivery, accessibility, development initiatives and employment opportunities and, in doing so, may foster grievances which further fuel violence. In order to address this situation, the Afghan National Security Council passed the Afghanistan Peace and Reintegration Program (APRP) in July 2010. The APRP, which is introduced in the first piece in the CFC’s introductory report on “Peace and Reintegration”, “provides means for anti-government elements to renounce violence and reintegrate and become a productive part of Afghan society”. As highlighted in the following pages, such processes can draw upon international experience and frameworks regarding the reintegration of armed groups and fighters. This piece introduces the main challenges encountered in many international reintegration programmes and discusses how Afghanistan and other countries have utilised infrastructure-related activities to help combatants transition to civilian life.  Download PDF (586.6 KB)

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