UNDP steps up Afghan capacity ahead of major transitions

February 9, 2012

UN Development Programme:

New York — The UN Development Programme (UNDP) is strengthening its ability to support Afghanistan ahead of the expected withdrawal of international forces.

We recognize that we are entering a totally new phase and we need to be prepared for what’s coming,” UNDP Associate Administrator Rebeca Grynspan told envoys from international donor governments Tuesday.

She stressed an ongoing need to focus on gender equality, anti-corruption, and governance, continuing to build capacity of Afghan institutions—at national, provincial and local levels—to effectively deliver quality services to the population.

Following a strategic review of all activities in Afghanistan that began in 2011, UNDP will enhance programme convergence and coordination and set up a dedicated unit to boost UNDP’s role as a policy adviser and enhance programme coordination.

“Despite the risks and challenges of working there, we need to find the most qualified staff to work hand-in-hand with the Afghan institutions and we need to recruit proactively,” Grynspan said.

UNDP’s major activities in Afghanistan are linked under three clusters—crisis prevention and recovery, poverty reduction and democratic governance—with gender imbalances being addressed across them. Programme delivery to Afghanistan totaled $752 million in 2011.

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