“On the Mend? America Comes to Its Senses,” by Andrew J. Bacevich

June 28, 2011

Andrew J. Bacevich is professor of history and international relations at Boston University and a retired career officer in the United States Army. His most recent book is Washington Rules: America’s Path to Permanent War.

“…..Nearly 10 years have passed since Washington set out to redeem the Greater Middle East.  The crusades have not gone especially well.  In fact, in the pursuit of its saving mission, the American messiah has pretty much worn itself out.

Today, the post-9/11 fever finally shows signs of abating.  The evidence is partial and preliminary.  The sickness has by no means passed.  Oddly, it lingers most strongly in the Obama White House, of all places, where a keenness to express American ideals by dropping bombs seems strangely undiminished.

Yet despite the urges of some in the Obama administration, after nearly a decade of self-destructive flailing about, American recovery has become a distinct possibility.  Here’s some of the evidence:

Read on

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