Previous Events

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Vermont’s Green Mountain Global Forum hosts TFOL screening 2/23

The Green Mountain Global Forum
Thursday, February 23rd, 7-9pm
Big Picture Theater, 48 Carroll Road, Waitsfield, Vermont
FREE and open to the public
For more information call 496-2111

The Fruit of Our Labor: Afghan Perspectives in Film with Michael Sheridan
Filmmaker Michael Sheridan will present and discuss excerpts from the collection of ten remarkable short films presented under the title The Fruit of Our Labor: Afghan Perspectives in Film, a series of short documentaries. The films focus on issues of social and economic development, as documented and told by Afghans themselves, and present intimate glimpses into routine struggles of employment, education and health and of accomplishments and failings at the level of community and infrastructure.

The Green Mountain Global Forum promotes greater awareness and understanding of global issues by bringing knowledgeable and thought provoking speakers to the Mad River Valley; thereby, encouraging community connections and involvement while inspiring change and action.

Thank you to Nancy Turner and Tara Hamilton for making this event happen!

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Clark University hosts TFOL screening in Worcester, MA – 2/22

Clark University

 

 

 

 

Screening & Discussion: Wednesday February 22, 2012  – 6:30 pm
Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester –  Jefferson 218
Free and open to the public

Presented by Goddard Library and the IDCE Social Change Fellows, Clark University will host Community Supported Film and Director Michael Sheridan for a screening and discussion of “The Fruit of Our Labor”.  For more information, contact info[at]csfilm[dot]org or 617-834-7206.

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Digital Storytelling from Afghanistan – Presentation and Screening at Harvard’s KSG 2/3

“Digital Storytelling from Afghanistan.” Michael Sheridan, Catherine Rielly

Friday February 3, 2012, 2:10PM – 4:00PM, Carr Center Conference Room, HKS, One Eliot St.

Filmmaker Michael Sheridan presents his remarkable story of assisting ten Afghan filmmakers to craft insightful community stories and how these stories have been brought to wide audiences through the work of Community Supported Film.   This session will use The Fruit of Our Labor films to illustrate basic principles of filmmaking and report on the social networking now in progress.

Michael Sheridan, DevCom Mentor since 2001, is an independent producer of film and video with a special interest in international issues of social and economic development in Africa and Asia.  www.sheridanworks.com

Catherine Rielly, a DevCom Executive Producer, is the President of Rubia, a non-profit organization whose mission is to develop economic opportunities through craft heritage, to support education, and to promote health and well-being for Afghan women and their families.

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Additional Screeing added by Belmont World Film, Boston.com’s “Editor’s Pick!”

Additional Screeing added by Belmont World Film – 
Boston.com’s “Editor’s Pick!”

Tickets are free but must be reserved either at the Benton or online at www.MKtix.com/bwf

The Fruit of Our Labor – Afghan Perspectives in Film, Screening and Presentation

Friday, February 3rd, 7:30-9:30
Benton Library
75 Oakley Road
Belmont, MA

The response was so positive to the films we showed on Monday that we have decided to show the rest (and repeat a few of the favorites) at a screening next Friday, February 3rd, at 7:30pm at the Benton Library in Belmont.  Please spread the word.  Admission is free with a suggested donation of $10 to help continue CSFilm’s work.

Many thanks to Belmont World Film and Ellen Gitelman for organizing this screening!

Please forward this information to your community of family, friends, and colleagues.Like http://www.facebook.com/pages/Community-Supported-Film/104486899639959 on Facebook Follow CSFilm on Facebook!

Please donate to Community Supported Film

Please support our training and education work.  Audience members have stated repeatedly that watching The Fruit of Our Labor, even after 10 years of media coverage, was the first time they heard Afghans voices and saw more than fleeting views into Afghan life.  We depend on your donations to continue this work.

 

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Artists and Activists International Panel Presentation with CSFilm founder Michael Sheridan 1/27


Artist & Activist Conference:
Public Spaces, Forbidden Places

Friday, January 27, 2012
9:00am-4:00pm (6 LMHC CEUs)
Marran Theater, Doble Campus, Lesley University 
(36 Mellen Street, Cambridge)
$125 for the general public, $95 for Lesley alumni/faculty, 
$65 for Lesley students

Michael Sheridan, founder of Community Supported film will be present for:

1. International Presentations and Panel, 10am-11:30, Friday, January 27 @ Marran Theater (Doble Campus)

2. KICKOFF EVENT: Film Screening of The Fruit of Our Labor and Q&A with Michael Sheridan, Thursday, January 26 @ University Hall Amphitheater (Porter Campus) FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

http://www.lesley.edu/ce/ls/conferences.html

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Screening: Belmont World Film with Afghan dinner

Many thanks to Belmont World Film and Ellen Gitelman for organizing this screening!

Monday, January 23
Dinner: 5:30 Ariana Restaurant, 129 Brighton Avenue, Brighton
Screening: 7:30, Studio Cinema, 376 Trapelo Road in Belmont
See details below

The Fruit of Our Labor is comprised of 10 short films made by native Afghans as part of Community Supported Film’s (CSF) intensive 5-week documentary production training program in Afghanistan in late 2010, each documentary offering a personal and first-hand point of view rarely seen or heard in the US, even after 10 years of intense media coverage. Together the films bring to life Afghans’ efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions and provide a fresh perspective on the needs and issues of Afghans beyond the relentless battlefront coverage of Western media. The goal of these films is to promote discussion about the lives of individuals in Afghanistan and our role there, as well as more generally, about war, peace, effective aid, gender issues, and cross-cultural understanding.

Optional Afghan dinner: The screening is preceded by an Afghan dinner with CSF Founder Michael Sheridan at 5:30 PM at Ariana Restaurant (129 Brighton Avenue, Brighton) for a separate cost of $29. Ariana will also provide a traditional Afghan snack at the screening.

Speakers: Community Supported Film Founder Michael Sheridan and several native Afghans. Michael is a filmmaker, educator and activist whose films address issues of social and economic development who was the co-founder of Oxfam America’s documentary production unit in the mid-90s. For nearly 20 years he has engaged the public in stories from Asia, Africa and the Americas about people in poor and developing communities challenging the status quo and struggling to improve their lives. His films have aired on PBS, ABC, TLC, and the Discovery Channel.

Purchase advance dinner & film screening tickets online here or to reserve your spot for the dinner and pay by check, send an email with the number of people to info@belmontworldfilm.org.  Space at the dinner is limited, so please reserve early.

Tickets to the screening may also be purchased on day of show at the Studio Cinema box office, 376 Trapelo Road in Belmont, Massachusetts.

 

This program is supported in part by a grant from the Belmont Cultural Council, a local agency which is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency.
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Screening: AIB Conference on Artists and Activism, 1/26

Thanks very much to Nathan Felde and the staff and students at Art Institute Boston for organizing this conference and including a screening of The Fruit of Our Labor

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC EVENT:
Presentation and screening of The Fruit of Our Labor  

Thursday, January 26, 2012 from 7:00-9:00pm
University Hall Amphitheater (Room 2-150), Porter Campus,
Lesley University (1815 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge)

 

Michael Sheridan, founder of Community Supported Films, will be present to talk about and show this film, a collection of ten remarkable short films made in Afghanistan about ordinary Afghans’ efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions. 

 

 

 

This screening is the Kick Off for the
Artist & Activist Conference: Public Spaces, Forbidden Places
Friday, January 27, 2012, 9:00am-4:00pm
Please visit www.lesley.edu/ce/ls/conferences.html for more information.
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“Death to the Camera” wins Best Documentary award and meets resistance

Death to the Camera,” produced during CSFilm’s training and included in The Fruit of Our Labor collection, wins Best Documentary Award at the 1st KABUL HUMAN RIGHTS FILM FESTIVAL, Kabul, Afghanistan.


Congratulations to director Qasem Husseini, editor Hamed Alizadeh, sound person Mona Haidari and translator and assistant conceptualizer Jamal Aram Amiry.  This acknowledgment reaffirms Community Supported Film’s commitment to offering trainings in documentary filmmaking and to encouragimg new filmmakers to produce films that are daring in structure and powerful in story. As reported in The Hindu Arts Magazine, the film was well received in Kabul and met with protest in Mazar-e-sharif:

In Mazar-e-sharif  …  “The Islamic Sharia Department disrupted the screenings of ‘Paper Boats’ and ‘Death to Camera’ — they pulled down the banners of the festival, shouted slogans and disrupted the screenings,” according to Malek Shafi, the Festival Director. “But we will have this festival every year as we hope that by running it in a territory of war and tragedy we will be able to make the cultural identity of Afghanistan independent from political and militarism aspects”, Shaffi said.

Great respect goes out to Shaffi and the whole AHRFF team who stood their ground and produced this important festival and public service.

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Arlington Film Festival Screening with Q&A. – October 7th

The Festival’s mission is to promote an increased appreciation for all cultures by showcasing the real lives of people all over the globe through independent film and to nurture the next generation of talented filmmakers within our community.

Screening five films from the collection The Fruit of Our Labor followed by Q&A
October 7th, 2011, 7 pm,
Regent Theater, 7 Medford Street, Arlington, MA
More info: http://www.aiffest.org/

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Screening/Discussion with Kathy Kelly, October 1 – Ten Years After Conference –

Afghanistan: The US Must Change Course

Kathy Kelly, Voices for Creative Nonviolence, three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee
Perspectives from her recent peace delegations to Afghanistan

Michael Sheirdan, Community Supported Film
Afghan perspective through screening of one film from The Fruit of Our Labor collection and discussion

Moderator: Cole Harrison, Mass. Peace Action & UJP Afghanistan/Pakistan Task Force

12 noon to 1pm
Suffolk University
Donahue Building, Room 207
41 Temple St.
Boston MA

http://justicewithpeace.org/ten-years-after-schedule

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CSFilm on BU Panel, Monday with Andrew Bacevich, Thomas Barfield, Douglas Kriner and Neta Crawford

Boston University:

America at War: America and the West in the Islamic World — Al Qaeda and the Origin of 9/11 Attack

First in a series of panels marking 10 years of the U.S. at War since 9/11.
Speakers: Andrew Bacevich, Thomas Barfield, Douglas Kriner, Michael Sheridan
When: Monday, Sep 12, 2011 at 7:00pm until 8:15pm
Where: Boston University, Law School (Auditorium), 765 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA, USA

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CSFilm at DocUtah, September 14 and 15, panels and screenings

DocUtah: inspiring a global connection through documentary films and intellectual discussion.

Michael will attend DocUtah, September 14 and 15 to participate in two panels:

Filmmaker Seminar:
When: Wednesday, September 14th, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Where: Red Cliffs Cinema Theaters
1750 E. Red Cliffs Dr.
Washington, UT 84780
(435) 673-1994

DocUtah Commons
Every year, DocUtah and the Center for Education, Business and the Arts (CEBA) sponsors the Commons involving viewing films selected to inspire thought about important issues relating to rural communities. This year’s Commons is entitled “Kabul to Kanab”. “Kabul to Kanab” is a unique opportunity to view several short films (approximately eight minutes each) by young filmmakers in Afghanistan.
When: Thursday,September 15th, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Where: Crescent Moon Theater
150 South 100 East
Kanab, UT 84741

Additional Screenings of The Fruit of Our Labor:

When: Sat. 9/10 1-4pm – DSC Eccles Main
Mon. 9/12 7-9 p.m. – DSC Eccles Main
Where: Eccles Fine Arts Center *Festival Hub*
Dixie State College,
155 S. 700 E.
St. George, Utah

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CSFilm at Woods Hole Film Festival with Sebastian Junger, Charles Sennott and Beth Murphy

Posted by Ali Pinschmidt

On Friday August 5th, Community Supported Film presented its Afghan-made documentary series The Fruit of Our Labor at the20th annual Woods Hole Film Festival in Massachusetts. After the screening, CSFilm Director Michael Sheridan fielded questions and then participated in a panel discussion called Filmmaking and War.  The panelists included journalist Sebastian Junger – author of The Perfect Storm and filmmaker of the recent documentary Restrepo – and documentary filmmaker Beth Murphy, who produced and directed Beyond Belief and an upcoming film The List. Both the post–screening discussion and the panel were moderated by award-winning foreign correspondent Charles Sennott, who is also the Executive Editor and Co-Founder of GlobalPost.

The Fruit of Our Labor is a series of 10 documentary shorts made by Afghan filmmakers about the challenges of daily life on the ground. Restrepo documents the deployment of a U.S. platoon in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley.  In Charles’ words, these respective filmmakers are presenting “photographic negatives” of a similar theme. While Sebastian stated his case for making a non-political film that shows the experiences of young American soldiers in and out of battle, Michael reasoned that most Americans only experience Afghanistan from the perspective of battlefront coverage.  He further argued that we need an understanding of Afghanistan from Afghan villagers’ point of view. “Only then will we be able to help ourselves and the people of Afghanistan,” he stated.

Sebastian said that many Afghans thought that 9-11 was a chance to get help from the world, and were excited by this turn of events. However, Sebastian continued, “the effort was squandered by the Bush administration, who forgot Afghanistan and went to Iraq.” Most of the cost of war, he agreed, is borne by civilians.

 

When asked about Afghan resilience, Michael compared the 15-month experience of US troops against the lifetime that many Afghan citizens have experienced the impact of war. With this in mind, he said, “Resilience is not even an issue. [Afghans] can’t do anything but survive; resiliency doesn’t even register anymore”. Referring to the experiences of those he works and lives with in Afghanistan, Michael said that Afghans are shattered physically and mentally, and they lack the type of therapeutic resources that might be available elsewhere. The toll that this takes can result in caustic attitudes, humor, distrust, and aggression. Recently, as president Obama announced troop withdrawal, tensions soared and Afghans, fearing the return of civil war, reviewed the escape plans available to them. For example, days after the Obama announcement a woman showed up at Michael’s door looking for assistance with her application to a community college in Nebraska.

Charles commented that watching The Fruit of Our Labor “was like coming into the middle of a conversation in Afghanistan” – and with unexpected revelations. He said it was eye-opening to him to hear such crass and saucy talk from veiled Afghan women, such as when one woman in Death to the Camera says she “would crush my husband’s balls if he became an addict.”

When asked about the goals for distributing each of the panelists’ films, Michael noted that he hopes The Fruit of Our Labor can foster discussions in general about Afghanistan, hopefully on a congressional and community level all across the country. One idea raised by Charles was how to get The Fruit of Our Labor seen by US military audiences and Restrepo seen more by Afghan civilians and insurgents.

Michael also talked about how ethnic conflict is a core issue in Afghanistan.  A welcomed effect of the 5-week training program was the positive growth that resulted from people of different ethnic backgrounds working together. The small team of 10 trainees represented 3 ethnic groups and included 4 women. While ethnic tensions made the work difficult at times, trainee evaluations throughout the program consistently highlighted what an amazing multi-cultural experience it was.

Screening The Fruit of Our Labor within Afghanistan has the same potential for bridging ethnic divisions. Michael noted that since pessimism and skepticism are so high in the country, for Afghan viewers to see other Afghans doing something positive really gets people talking. Even simply seeing non-scripted nonfiction films is a new experience in Afghanistan, as most people have only been exposed to soaps and Bollywood movies.

The event included a discussion of next steps. Michael explained that CSFilm’s goal, funding dependent, is to make the training and mentoring program in Afghanistan sustainable. This will include an ongoing cycle of teaching video production and post-production, proposal writing and business management, mentoring Afghans through the production of their own commissioned and independent films and the use of these films for public engagement locally and internationally.

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CSFilmmakers present at World Bank

The World Bank office in Kabul invited Community Supported Film’s emerging filmmakers to present their work to their foreign and Afghan staff in April. Presentations like this are a great opportunity for two-way exchange and an important component of Community Supported Film’s educational mission.

The Afghans in the audience, all World Bank employees, learned about documentary film and its role in expanding knowledge and critical discourse, and about social and economic development issues. For the foreign staff, the films provided a view of development activities and local perspectives that they have limited access to due to their security restrictions. For the filmmakers it was helpful to experience how audiences interpret their work and how they can best communicate about and defend their intentions.

The Afghans present at the screening challenged a number of the filmmakers about what they perceived as negative depictions oftheir country and people. This is not an uncommon reaction. Unfamiliar with the nature of documentary film, many Afghans assume the subjects are instructed in what to do and say. The idea that people would be filmed going about their daily lives and speaking their own minds is new to many. Typically the only voices heard in Afghan news and non-fiction film are those of the authoritative narrator and the political, economic and religious elite. To give voice to the uneducated and to depict the lives of construction workers, bakers, and banana sellers – especially if they are women – is perceived by some as irresponsible and counter-productive to the positive portrayal of development in the country.

Some Afghans in the audience assumed that the films were made for foreigners, and therefore felt even more strongly that the filmmakers had a responsibility as Afghans to select their characters more carefully, and that the characters should represent the norms of the society and provide a positive outlook. One viewer chastised Aqeela Rezai, maker of the film The Road Above about a female construction worker; he argued that she had depicted an extreme situation since he had never seen a woman wearing a burqa working on road construction.

For the filmmakers it was an excellent opportunity to explain and defend their work. One of the challenges for an artist is to be able to listen to criticism without getting defensive. One of the Afghan viewers, who happened to disagree with many of his colleague’s criticisms of the films, was critical of the filmmakers for reacting defensively. He felt they should learn to listen to the comments and explain their choices but not get defensive and angry if people expressed opinions that they didn’t agree with.

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Harvard University Talk

 

Creating an effective documentary is a decidedly difficult task; one must carefully consider both the story and its intended audience, and along the way, balance the variety of perspectives that comprise the finished product. In 2009, documentary filmmaker Michael Sheridan attempted this complex undertaking, and worked to capture on film the true conditions of war-stricken Afghanistan. To achieve a more realistic representation of the underdeveloped nation, Sheridan trained a group of Afghani students in the art of documentary filmmaking, so that their stories could be told in their own voices.

Sheridan visited Harvard to discuss this project in a talk at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE)

[Read Harvard Crimson Article]

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Screening Tour – The Fruit of Our Labor

  • “Transformative”
  • “Eye-opening and Disturbing”
  • “The first time in ten years I’ve actually heard an Afghan’s voice”
  • “I’ve made a film in Afghanistan. I’ve seen the results of other trainings. Nothing compares to what your trainees have accomplished.”

Those are a few of the hundreds of viewer’s responses to The Fruit of Our Labor short-films produced by Afghans during CSFilm’s documentary production training last fall. It has been a very rewarding few months. The films have created the kind of response we hoped for. They have helped Americans see another side of Afghanistan beyond the relentless battlefront coverage of the western media. These films allow Americans to understand more about who Afghans are, the challenges they face and the efforts they aremaking to move their lives, communities and country beyond its terrible past.  Understanding what Afghan civilians face should play an important part in our considerations of what our role should be in Afghanistan. There are very real humanitarian concerns beyond our interests to get our own troops out.

Since December I am very thankful for all the effort individuals, organizations, and communities have put into organizing presentations and screenings. This commitment has allowed the films and work of Community Supported Film to be presented at dozens of venues during a 19 city tour, including: The Asia Society – NYC, The US Institute of Peace – DC, Harvard, Tufts, Boston and Carnegie Mellon Universities and a live event between Kabul and Pittsburgh at Conflict Kitchen – a take-out restaurant that only serves cuisine from countries that the US is in conflict with.

My tears at the end of the Conflict Kitchen event surprised me. A video connection between the audience in Pittsburgh and the filmmakers in Afghanistan allowed the two groups to virtually share a meal of Bolani while watching a selection of the films. The screening was followed by a wonderfully engaging conversation full of revelations, ideas and hopes. The bridge building between communities was direct. It brought together all my dreams for the work of Community Supported Film: the training in Afghanistan led to the making of revealing stories, which then provided a unique opportunity for public engagement and education.

Please help us make the most of these remarkable films and organize a screening in your community. We are planning now for our summer and fall screenings. We are especially interested in opportunities to create direct conversations between your community and the filmmakers and others in Afghanistan. Please email info[at]csfilm[dot]org with your ideas.

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Upcoming Events

April 14th, Thursday, 3-4pm
Kabul, Afghanistan
The World Bank
Afghanistan Country Office
House 19, Street 15
Wazir Akbar Khan
The Fruit of Our Labor: Afghan Perspectives in Film – A presentation and screening by the the Afghan filmmakers about their films and the ongoing work of Community Supported Film-Afghanistan

Please let us know if you can host a presentation and screening at your home, institution or in your community.

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First screenings and discussions in the States

The following is an excerpt from an email sent to the Community Supported Film team of filmmakers that has now been founded, post training, in Kabul:

Dear Team,

This week I am working on a revised proposal for funding from the US Embassy, preparing for screenings and speaking opportunities and catching up on many many things left unattended while away.

Monday, I made two presentations of the films followed by discussions.  In both cases I introduced the training, the filmmakers, the work of CSF and showed the excerpts of the films and took questions and comments.

In the morning I presented to students and faculty at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and in the evening to graduate students at the Massachusetts College of Art.  All were very impressed by the quality of the filmmaking, the amount learned and the issues of everyday Afghan life represented by the films.

To my surprise, a few of the art students in the evening didn’t believe the authenticity of the work – primarily because from their point of view the war is not mentioned or shown at all.  When I tried to explain that the film’s intention is to present outsiders a view of Afghanistan beyond the battlefront it became clear that the western media has created such a strong impression of Afghanistan being only about war, terror and extremism, that viewers can not trust a representation that does not include these things.  I am very interested to know what you and the others reaction to this is.  Have we created a false image of daily life in Afghanistan?  I don’t believe so but you should give some feedback.  It would be great if some of the filmmakers could be interviewed about this on tape.  I could include some of this then in the screenings.

Another response from a minority of the viewers was that these films do not represent an Afghan perspective because they feel too ‘western’ in style.  (And others felt they were too good in quality to actually have been made during the 5 week training!) This is very interesting because of course the intention of the training was to help professionalize Afghan documentary filmmaking – so that trainees can get work and make there own high quality films.

I am interested to know if for any of you, this ‘quality’ of filmmaking seems forced by a western stylistic approach?  To some art students in the US, if the films look to be made in the ‘western’ tradition of documentary filmmaking and do not include a unique Afghan documentary filmmaking style, then they can not represent an honest Afghan perspective.  This is a very interesting subject and one we should all think about and discuss further.  I would very much like to know if you all feel that an external style of filmmaking has been forced on you or that you have been taught ‘universal’ aspects of the art and craft of filmmaking and will move on to develop your own style as your careers develop?

I am missing you all very much,

Best wishes,
Michael

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Training Concludes with Kabul Screening

The final weeks of postproduction were packed with repeated reviews of 10 rough cuts. Four editors worked 10-12 hours a day with the directors at their side, transcribing, logging or out picking up additional footage.

Pari Gul and her son took great care of our stomachs and taste buds. (Wow, can these folks eat!)  Fakhria brought her baby daughter to keep us entertained. (Afghans absolutely adore children.  it was remarkable to see how that baby was passed from person to person – and how perfectly happy she was with it – no shyness or wining for mom here!).

We had to extract ourselves from our rented training center.  The last few days of endless translating and subtitling was completed at the offices of our co-producer, The Killid Group, and in my room/office. No great achievements can be accomplished it seems without the requisite all nighter – so we threw that in as well.

After 5 invigorating weeks of training plus one week of polishing and subtitling, the student’s presented their ten films at a public screening.  They have produced some incredible films – one would hardly know that most of them are first time documentary filmmakers.  It was a wonderful and celebratory completion to a very intense experience for all, at the end of which the student’s and team where presented with certificates of completion and appreciation.  A stimulating discussion between audience and filmmakers and then a dinner with most of the training team and students followed the screening.

It is extremely rewarding that we received emails the next morning from screening attendees asking if the filmmakers are available to work on projects and to submit proposals. And, the regional director from the World Bank came and was so impressed by the work that she invited all of  the students to present their films to staff at the World Bank’s Afghanistan Office.  (The WB is a major funder, overseer and protector of the National Solidarity Program).

We were not so successful at attracting the foreign community or the press.  That said Voice of America was in attendance to gather materials for a special report that they are producing for their youth program.  A big thanks goes to Jawed, who served as a trainer, for making that happen.  CNN may also be working on a story.

For now, rest is needed, but I’d be thrilled if we were starting another training next week.  There is no part of it from the outreach and interviewing through the hands on learning and the last great push that has not been very stimulating.  Of course the company has been fantastic.  We have made a great team and I look forward to the continued work together on the making of Brewing Tea in a Kettle of War.

Mehdi and Jamal were talking and one said to the other, “I can’t believe it, it’s magic – 10 films in 5 weeks – magic.”  The magic has been the great energy, smarts, high spirits and unwavering determination that everyone brought to the work.  Please make it all worthwhile and watch the films!

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‘Fruits of our Labor’ film screening Nov 10th at FCCS, Kabul

We hope you can join us for the screening of films made by the students of the Community Supported Film documentary filmmaking training.   The students have produced an incredible collection of compelling stories that bring to life Afghan’s experiences of and efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions.

Fruits of our Labor – Film Screening
Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 15:00
Foundation for Culture and Civil Society (FCCS)
Salang Watt 869, Kabul, Afghanistan (up ally across from the Police Commander Headquarters)
Further Information: Jamal : 0799415454

We are very thankful to The Killid Group for co-sponsoring this project and for the generous support of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and the Danish Embassy.

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