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Premiere US Screening of all Ten Haitian-made Films.

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Owning Our Future-Haitian Perspectives in Film
Get your tickets now for the premiere US screening of all ten Haitian-made films.

Wednesday, October 21, 7:15-8:50pm
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, at 355 Binney Street, Cambridge, MA, 02139
Q&A following with Michael Sheridan, filmmaker, educator and director of Community Supported Film

Arlington International Festival: October 15 – 22, 2015

Owning Our Future-Haitian Perspectives in Film
Ten Haitian-made fims that provide a unique opportunity to experience Haiti as it is lived by street vendors, business women, artists, farmers and more. Their stories, focusing on the economic and social development challenges faced by Haitians, nourish an understanding of Haiti that goes beyond its man-made and natural disasters.

Building Local Capacity – Giving Voice to Haitians
In the fall of 2014, Community Supported Film in collaboration with Groupe Medialternatif conducted an intensive 5-week documentary filmmaking training. Ten Haitians, with storytelling experience in print, radio, photo or TV journalism, theater, and ction writing, were selected from 83 applicants. Most had no previous experience with filmmaking. After three weeks of rigorous exercises, each student researched and produced a lived-reality documentary short. The resulting lms are gathered in this collection. Let us know what you think at www.csfilm.org.

Produced by Community Supported Film and Groupe Medialternatif
Community Supported Film, Boston, USA,  strengthens the documentary storytelling capacity in countries where the dissemination of objective and accurate information is essential for effective development and conflict resolution.

Groupe Medialternatif, Port-au-Prince, Haiti,  produces independent media, creates media spaces and alternative means of communication, promotes exchanges on journalism and communication and provides media production services.

More info at csfilm.org and medialternatif.org

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London, England-The Messenger is the Message

THE FOUNDRY A Place for Change

The Messenger is the Message

Michael Sheridan will speak at The Foundry, London (July 7, 12:00-1:00)  about his work to put Afghans and Haitians in charge of the storytelling about their community’s economic and social development issues.

Michael went to Afghanistan in 2009 to make a documentary on effective development from the perspective of Afghan villagers. He trained Afghan women and men in lived-reality documentary filmmaking and they produced ten short films that provide a unique view of Afghans’ daily efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions. Community Supported Film completed a similar project with Haitians at the end of 2014. The films allow Haitians to report on their country’s social and economic development 5 years after the devastating earthquake.

Michael is a filmmaker and educator whose documentary films address issues of social and economic development and the tipping point between order and chaos.

Tuesday, July 7, 12:00-1:00
The Foundry, 17 Oval Way, London SE11 5RR

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Brighton, England-The Messenger is the Message

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The Messenger is the Message

Michael Sheridan will speak at the Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, England, (July 2, 13:00-14:30) about his work to put Afghans and Haitians in charge of the storytelling about their community’s economic and social development issues.

Michael went to Afghanistan in 2009 to make a documentary on effective development from the perspective of Afghan villagers. He trained Afghan women and men in lived-reality documentary filmmaking and they produced ten short films that provide a unique view of Afghans’ daily efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions. Community Supported Film completed a similar project with Haitians at the end of 2014. The films allow Haitians to report on their country’s social and economic development 5 years after the devastating earthquake.

Michael is a filmmaker and educator whose documentary films address issues of social and economic development and the tipping point between order and chaos.

Thursday, July 2, 13.00-14.30
Institute of Development Studies
Room 221, University of Sussex, Brighton

Tuesday, July 7, 12:00-13:00
The Foundry, 17 Oval Way, London SE11 5RR

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Owning Our Future- Haitian Perspective films accepted into Jamaican film festival

Owning Our Future films ‘Ghetto Green, Ghetto Clean,’ ‘Threading the Needle’ & ‘Brave The World’ accepted into this year’s GATFFEST Film Festival, June 25-28, Kingston and Montego Bay, Jamaica.  

GATFFEST 2015

On Friday, the Centre for Tourism and Policy Research of the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, launched the Greater August Town Film Festival (GATFFEST) 2015 at its Western Jamaica Campus (WJC) in Montego Bay, St James. The film festival is to be held from June 25-28 jointly in Montego Bay and Kingston.

Dubbed “the biggest community film festival in the Caribbean” GATFFEST, which was initiated in 2012 in August Town, St Andrew, serves as a platform to showcase films produced by underserved communities participating in the UWI’s Community Film Project.

Activities during the four-day event include film workshops and screening of local, regional and international short films, along with an awards ceremony. June 26 is slated as Film Day in Montego Bay.

Diverse Cultures

Ian Boxill, professor of management studies and director, Centre for Tourism and Policy Research, indicated that 72 film submissions have been received so far from inside and outside Jamaica. The entries reflect not only the diverse cultures of and entertainment fare from those countries, but their way of life.

“We have a wide cross sections of films from drama to animation, comedy, sci-fi, documentaries … . It is really diverse. Films have been submitted from all continents except Africa , so we have a good variety,” said Professor Boxill.

He expressed optimism that just over 20 students from western Jamaica will be trained in filmmaking at the WJC in the upcoming school year.

Kadeem Wilson, GATFFEST brand ambassador and who plays a central role in the feature film Ghett-a-Life , said while persons such as Usain Bolt and Tessanne Chin have helped the world to be in tune with Brand Jamaica, the principals in the filmmaking industry keep “missing the boat”.

“There are so many projects, film projects, that we have missed the boat so many times in getting it to be shot on Jamaican soil. For example Home Again, which is an entirely Jamaican script and entirely Jamaican, but it was not shot here. It was shot in Trinidad and Tobago. So you understand the concern, the concern is that so many times you have a major project that is authentically Jamaican, it is not being shot here, ” said Wilson.

He said local film industry stakeholders need to bring in experts from overseas to give them insight on how to develop the Hollywood look, improving the cinematography and audio. Wilson said that GATFFEST is a move in the right direction.

“I am very proud of GATTFEST and very happy to be a part of this initiative. It has really shown us that we need to come together and hold our industry in our hand and walk with it and get everyone engaged and involved,” said Wilson.

Acting director of UWI, WJC, Patrick Prendergast, said the community film project has provided the campus with another opportunity to develop the region’s intellectual capacity and empower the youth.

“We are always very delighted to be part of these events. Certainly it helps us to move closer and deeper into these communities,” he said.

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Haitian Film Screening & Discussion, June 19, Cambridge, MA

Fri Jun 19, 2015, 7pm, Free
Mobius, 55 Norfolk Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

CSFilm founder and director Michael Sheridan will present a screening of Owning Our Future – Haitian Perspectives in Film and will discuss how stories told by Haitians themselves can augment our understanding of Haiti’s post-earthquake relief efforts and provide a chance for us to experience Haiti as it is lived by Haitian street vendors, business women, artists, and farmers.

In 2014, Community Supported Film(CSFilm) conducted an intensive 5-week training of 10 Haitian women and men in documentary production. A collection of ten remarkable short films, Owning Our Future – Haitian Perspectives in Film (csfilm.org/films/haitian-perspectives-in-film), was produced during the training.

Going beyond disaster reporting, these films will ensure the experiences and points of view of Haitians are included in the international conversation about what has and has not happened since the 2010 7.0 earthquake – one of the world’s worst disasters. The films will also be used to increase dialogue and influence public policy internationally and in Haiti regarding effective foreign aid and sustainable development.

In a climate where mainstream American media typically reports international news from an American perspective with a focus on disaster and crisis, Community Supported Film (CSFilm) believes that local stories help us to better understand foreign events, diverse cultures and people’s complex realities.

Inspired by the model of Community Supported Agriculture, Community Supported Film applies the principle of investing in people on the ground by supporting the creation of locally-produced films. The resulting products help nourish a deeper understanding of the world that isn’t available in the mainstream media marketplace.

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