Previous Events

0

Meet the Filmmakers, Meet your Neighbors

Immigrant filmmakers share stories with neighbors in South End, Roxbury, Dorchester

While Denzel Washington films scenes for his latest movie a few blocks away, ten immigrant filmmakers based in the South End/Roxbury are producing ten short documentary films about the immigrant experience in Boston. You may have seen them around the neighborhood, at Ramsey Park or at SoWa Market, working on their filming techniques and interviewing skills as part of the New Immigrant and Refugee Visions project of Community Supported Film, a local nonprofit organization. While Denzel Washington films scenes for his latest movie a few blocks away, ten immigrant filmmakers based in the South End/Roxbury are producing ten short documentary films about the immigrant experience in Boston. You may have seen them around the neighborhood, at Ramsey Park or at SoWa Market, working on their filming techniques and interviewing skills as part of the New Immigrant and Refugee Visions project of Community Supported Film, a local nonprofit organization.

 

New Immigrant and Refugee Visions Filmmakers Front: Abdirahman Abdi of Somalia, Braulio Tellez Vilches of Cuba, Kebrowsen (Kiki) Densamo of Ethiopia. Middle: Sayed Hashimi of Afghanistan, Katsyris Rivera Kientz of Puerto Rico, Qin Li of China, Assistant Trainer Samantha Corsini, Mubarak Muwonge Nsamba of Uganda. Back: Wilson Thelimo Louis of Haiti, Rafael DeLeon of the Dominican Republic, Trainer and CSFilm Founder Michael Sheridan, Mohammed Arifuzzuman of Bangladesh.

On Saturday, October 21st these filmmakers are teaming up with the Roxbury-Dorchester Power in Community coalition of Episcopal churches to host a “Meet the Filmmakers, Meet your Neighbors” reception from 4-6pm at the Church of St. Augustine and St. Martin, 31 Lenox Street (near Ramsey Park and Jim Rice Field, and home to Community Supported Film offices).

 

Each of the filmmakers will share briefly about their personal stories emigrating from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, China, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Somalia, and Uganda. They will also talk about the films they are making, which will show an insider’s perspective on the challenges immigrants face and the contributions they make to our neighborhoods and society.

As many of the filmmakers are new immigrants, they are looking forward to meeting their neighbors. They know they share similar immigrant stories with many families in the neighborhood and are eager to engage in conversation, in a variety of languages, over refreshments from around the world.

They are also looking forward to meeting the neighbors who have an interest in the arts, in filmmaking, and in social justice issues. All the filmmakers have a desire to advance social justice through the multi-media blend of journalism and art that is documentary film. They know that the South End/Roxbury area has a rich heritage of activism and cultural vitality and hope to meet many of those who have made this neighborhood what it is today – to learn first hand about the history and rich social fabric they are becoming a part of.

 

Roxbury-Dorchester Power in Community Leaders Front: The Rev. Edwin Johnson, The Rev. Dorothella Littlepage, The Rev. Evan Thayer, The Rev. Rospignac Ambrose. Back: The Rev. Christopher Whiteman

The Church of St. Augustine and St. Martin has sponsored the home office of Community Supported Film for a number of years, alongside the many other community-based organizations and youth programs it supports in conjunction with their partner parishes in Roxbury-Dorchester Power in Community: St. Cyprian’s, St. John St. James, St. Mary’s, and St. Mark’s. Roxbury-Dorchester Power in Community was founded by the Episcopal congregations of Roxbury and Dorchester, in partnership with the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts, to celebrate, connect, leverage, and enhance the abundant gifts of their neighborhoods by fostering deep relationships among the diverse populations.

Meet the Filmmakers, Meet your Neighbors

Saturday, October 21st, 2017 4-6p

Church of St. Augustine and St. Martin, 31 Lenox Street, Boston

Refreshments from around the world. Multi-cultural music.

All are welcome. RSVP is appreciated to Rev. Dee Littlepage at: ">rd_pic@icloud.com

0

Index of Select Previous Events

1

Screening of CSFilm’s Haitian-made films at Haitian Diaspora Challenge Initiative Symposium

Thankful for the opportunity  to screen films from “Owning Our Future-Haitian Perspectives in Film” today at the Haitian Diaspora Challenge Initiative Symposium.  The spirit of “Owning our Future” fit well with the general theme of the day that Haitians must own and implement the change they envision.  Paul G. Altidor, Ambassador to the US, spoke most directly to this issue.  The following are my notes from his remarks:

To change the cycle of poverty in Haiti we need to change the narrative that Haiti is nothing but a special need student.

The narrative of pity for Haiti is keeping Haiti down and pity is not a sustainable approach to development.  So often people tell me, “I’ve tried this Haiti thing so long, I’m done with it.”

I don’t want the Haitian Diaspora to end up with the same frustration because it takes a project-based approach rather than integrating their ideas into collaborative, movement-based initiatives.

It has proven to be counter productive to have all these individual initiatives.  A lot of smart, well thought out initiatives do not have a long-term view.

This project, that project, the other project, is not a strategic approach to long-term improvements inHaiti.  Projects need to situate themselves in movements, to make themselves a part of the ongoing dialogue.

Boston’s Mayor Walsh opened the day with a very positive, energetic set of remarks emphasising that no matter what happens in DC, Boston is and will remain an open, welcoming and safe place for all. Happy (especially after Trump’s inaugeration yesterday) to be engaged with this powerful day of reflection and recognition of sustainable, innovative development for Haiti, by Haitians. #LookListenLocal @csfilmorg @naahphaiti

0

Haitian Diaspora Challenge Initiative Symposium and CSFilm Screening

Thankful for the opportunity  to screen films from “Owning Our Future-Haitian Perspectives in Film” today at the Haitian Diaspora Challenge Initiative Symposium.  The spirit of “Owning our Future” fit well with the general theme of the day that Haitians must own and implement the change they envision.  Paul G. Altidor, Ambassador to the US, spoke most directly to this issue.  The following are my notes from his remarks:

To change the cycle of poverty in Haiti we need to change the narrative that Haiti is nothing but a special need student.

The narrative of pity for Haiti is keeping Haiti down and pity is not a sustainable approach to development.  So often people tell me, “I’ve tried this Haiti thing so long, I’m done with it.”

I don’t want the Haitian Diaspora to end up with the same frustration because it takes a project-based approach rather than integrating their ideas into collaborative, movement-based initiatives.

It has proven to be counter productive to have all these individual initiatives.  A lot of smart, well thought out initiatives do not have a long-term view.

This project, that project, the other project, is not a strategic approach to long-term improvements inHaiti.  Projects need to situate themselves in movements, to make themselves a part of the ongoing dialogue.

Boston’s Mayor Walsh opened the day with a very positive, energetic set of remarks emphasising that no matter what happens in DC, Boston is and will remain an open, welcoming and safe place for all. Happy (especially after Trump’s inaugeration yesterday) to be engaged with this powerful day of reflection and recognition of sustainable, innovative development for Haiti, by Haitians. #LookListenLocal @csfilmorg @naahphaiti

0

BNN Community TV airing excerpts of Haitian-made films

Tele Kreyol, the Haitian news and discussion program on Boston Neighborhood Network, is airing a special to commemorate the 7th anniversary of the Haiti earthquake. The program will include excerpts from the Haitian-made films Owning Our Future: Haitian Perspectives in Film.  The films were made during CSFilm’s training and production project with Haitian storytellers in 2014.

The program is in Kreyol.  BNN, January 10, 8:30-9:30pm,  Comcast 23 | RCN83

0

Filmmaking Fundamentals Class at MassArt, Boston

CSFilm Training AfghanistanMichael Sheridan will teach Filmmaking Fundamentals, a semester long class, beginning January 24th.   This course explores fiction and non-fiction filmmaking production and blends hands-on production with history and theory. Click here to see the full description and to register.

The course is open to the public and to students of all levels of experience.  Email michael@csfilm.org with any questions.

 

0

CSFilm will attend Haitian Diaspora Challenge Symposium – Will you join us?

Join us for the DCI Symposium at MIT on January 21, 2017. The Diaspora Challenge Initiative aims at leveraging ideas about successful development concepts amongst members of the Diaspora looking for opportunities to contribute to Haiti’s development. We will have special guests which include Ambassador Paul Altidor and Haitian Congressman Jerry Tardieu.The event is free to attend. Must register to attend. Link to register in bio. #dciHaiti #naahp #grahnusa #shr #edem #otgs

0

100+ students and faculty for CSFilm presentation at Highline College, Seattle WA

fd4805055d0543946d4267be197d1d78 0976371580cf18a648ebe0073a58ecbb



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos by Michael Sladek
highline-college-panoramic-building-8

0

Portland, OR – Screening and Presentation – Afghan and Haitian Films

flyer-universal-single-frontNW Documentary, 6 NE Tillamook St, Portland, Oregon 97212
(corner of Tillamook St. and Williams St.)

Thursday, October 27, 6-8pm, PDT

The Messenger is the Message-Local Perspectives in Film

Michael Sheridan, director of Community Supported Film, will introduce and screen Afghan and Haitian-made documentary films.  Michael went to Afghanistan in 2010 and trained Afghan journalists, storytellers and writers in lived-reality documentary filmmaking.  During this process they produced ten short films that provide a unique view of Afghans’ daily efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions.  Community Supported Film completed a similar project with Haitians at the end of 2014.

These films nourish an understanding of Haiti and Afghanistan that goes beyond the western media’s relentless focus on crises, conflicts and disasters.  It is CSFilm’s mission to take the foreign out of foreign correspondence by putting locals in charge of the storytelling about their community’s economic and social development issues.

$5 donation suggested at the door for event expenses

 

0

CSFilm Director to do three-day teaching residency at Highline College, WA

CSFilm training, Haiti

CSFilm documentary film training, Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 2014

CSFilm director Michael Sheridan has been invited by the Film Studies and Multimedia Design departments at Highline College to conduct classes and make a campus wide presentation over three days in October.

Highline provides community college programs and bachelors degrees to a diverse population in Des Moines Washington which overlooks beautiful Puget Sound and the Olympic Mountains.

With more than 15,000 students and 350,000 alumni, Highline is one of the state’s largest institutions and one of 34 community and technical colleges in the state of Washington.  For more than 50 years, community members have counted on Highline to meet their educational needs close to home. Today, students can pursue more than 100 fields of study – including Film Studies and Multimedia Design, the latter established in 2015.

highline-college-library-resourcesHighline is internationally recognized as a premiere community college, a reputation earned through the development of an institutional culture that values diversity, innovation, globalization of curriculum and community participation.  The college’s commitment to diversity, social justice and multiculturalism recently earned it prestigious awards: the 2014 Award of Excellence for Advancing Diversity from the American Association of Community Colleges and the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award three years in a row (2013–2015) from Insight Into Diversity magazine.

Michael is very much looking forward to working with students and faculty at Highline.  Thanks for the invitation!

0

Starting Sept 6: Filmmaking Fundamentals Course – Boston – 9/6-12/13, 2016

Michael Sheridan will teach a semester long Filmmaking Fundamentals course at MassArt, Boston, this fall.  Please join us or spread the word.

Class Name Film Production Fundamentals
Start Date September 6, 2016
End Date December 13, 2016
Meeting Days Tuesdays
Time 6:30-10pm
Room MassArt Tower-713/721
Instructor Michael Sheridan
Description An introduction to film/video production, this course will cover video production and post-production, principles of storytelling, as well as an overview of the history and theory of the different genres and aspects of filmmaking.   The class will be very hands on and students will work on projects that will be applicable to interactive, online, TV or big screen documentary, experimental and narrative approaches.
Instructor Bio Michael Sheridan, Founder and Director, Community Supported Film and SheridanWorks Productions.
For twenty years Michael Sheridan has produced films on people challenging the status quo and improving their economic and social condition. For 15 years Michael has taught filmmaking at the community and university level. In 1996 he co-founded Oxfam America’s documentary production unit, and later served as a Senior Fulbright Scholar in Indonesia. Michael founded Community Supported Film in 2010 to provide intensive training in documentary filmmaking to storytellers and activists in conflicted and developing communities. Their stories are screened in public engagement campaigns to educate concerned citizens and policymakers about sustainable paths to a more equitable and peaceful world.
Instructor Link http://www.csfilm.org, www.sheridanworks.com
Credits 3
Registration Course Details and Registration

For course information please contact Michael at michael@csfilm.org

For registration information please contact Susan at smendezdiez@massart.edu

0

THIS FRIDAY: Michael Sheridan to Present at ACM Annual Conference

ACM_web_header_551x2791Michael Sheridan, director and founder of Community Supported Film, will join Anthony Riddle, BRIC Brooklyn Public Network, and Bonnie Schumacher, St. Paul Neighborhood Network, to speak about building documentary programs at the Our Town Annual Conference of the Alliance for Community Media.

Friday, August 19 • 4:30pm – 6:00pm, Westin Hotel, 425 Summer St, Boston, MA 02210 (next to the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center)

Requires Registration

Building Documentary Programs

Community media has a place in documentary traditions and history, but recently community media centers have created programs that systematically seek to build the tradition in their communities. Some have created filmmaking programs, learning cohorts, film festivals and other ways to support documentary practice. We’ll talk about how to develop these programs, what works, and how these programs contribute to social change, community building and supporting local film communities.

Register here

 

0

Screening of Haitian-made films in Boston

Wednesday, June 29th, 6:00 – 8:30 PMOutdoors
Irish International Immigrant Center
100 Franklin Street, Lower Level, Boston, MA 02110 (entrance at 201 Devonshire St)

Join Community Supported Film (CSFilm) and the Irish International Immigrant Center (IIIC) for a screening and lively discussion of Owning Our Future – Haitian Perspectives in Film. Haitian documentary filmmakers, trained by CSFilm, with backgrounds in journalism, theater and poetry, provide a unique opportunity to experience Haiti as it is lived by street vendors, business women, artists, farmers and more. Their stories nourish an understanding of Haiti that goes beyond the western media’s focus on crises and disasters. See excerpts of the films at www.csfilm.org/films.

More Info: michael@csfilm.org or Sarah Chapple-Sokol, IIIC, 617-542-7654 extension 36.

0

Michael Sheridan teaching doc filmmaking course in Boston

JUDE0664 Edited&CroppedIf you are interested in learning documentary filmmaking and are in or can get to Boston, USA, I’ll be teaching an intensive one-week course at Massachusetts College of Art and Design January 11-15, 2016.

This is an immersive, hands-on learning experience. Participants will develop an understanding of shooting techniques, composition, sound, story development, interviewing and editing.  See MassArt’s Course Description for further information. Email me with any questions at michael@csfilm.org.

0

Afghan Films to Screen at Swedish Film Festival

TFOL DVD coverA selection of films from The Fruit of Our Labor-Afghan Perspectives in Film are screening at the 3rd Annual Afghan Documentary Film Festival in Stockholm, Sweden, December 11-13.

The films include Beyond Fatigue, by Baqir Tawakoli, Searching for a Path, by Reza Sahel, Death to the Camera, by Sayed Qasem Hossaini, ‘L’ is for Light, ‘D’ is for Darkness, by Hasibullah Asmaty and Bearing the Weight, by Mona Haidari. Congratulations to the filmmakers and to the festival organizers Basir Seerat and Amazon Rezai.

0

Premiere US Screening of all Ten Haitian-made Films.

download

 

 

 

Owning Our Future-Haitian Perspectives in Film
Get your tickets now for the premiere US screening of all ten Haitian-made films.

Wednesday, October 21, 7:15-8:50pm
Kendall Square Cinema, One Kendall Square, at 355 Binney Street, Cambridge, MA, 02139
Q&A following with Michael Sheridan, filmmaker, educator and director of Community Supported Film

Arlington International Festival: October 15 – 22, 2015

Owning Our Future-Haitian Perspectives in Film
Ten Haitian-made fims that provide a unique opportunity to experience Haiti as it is lived by street vendors, business women, artists, farmers and more. Their stories, focusing on the economic and social development challenges faced by Haitians, nourish an understanding of Haiti that goes beyond its man-made and natural disasters.

Building Local Capacity – Giving Voice to Haitians
In the fall of 2014, Community Supported Film in collaboration with Groupe Medialternatif conducted an intensive 5-week documentary filmmaking training. Ten Haitians, with storytelling experience in print, radio, photo or TV journalism, theater, and ction writing, were selected from 83 applicants. Most had no previous experience with filmmaking. After three weeks of rigorous exercises, each student researched and produced a lived-reality documentary short. The resulting lms are gathered in this collection. Let us know what you think at www.csfilm.org.

Produced by Community Supported Film and Groupe Medialternatif
Community Supported Film, Boston, USA,  strengthens the documentary storytelling capacity in countries where the dissemination of objective and accurate information is essential for effective development and conflict resolution.

Groupe Medialternatif, Port-au-Prince, Haiti,  produces independent media, creates media spaces and alternative means of communication, promotes exchanges on journalism and communication and provides media production services.

More info at csfilm.org and medialternatif.org

0

London, England-The Messenger is the Message

THE FOUNDRY A Place for Change

The Messenger is the Message

Michael Sheridan will speak at The Foundry, London (July 7, 12:00-1:00)  about his work to put Afghans and Haitians in charge of the storytelling about their community’s economic and social development issues.

Michael went to Afghanistan in 2009 to make a documentary on effective development from the perspective of Afghan villagers. He trained Afghan women and men in lived-reality documentary filmmaking and they produced ten short films that provide a unique view of Afghans’ daily efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions. Community Supported Film completed a similar project with Haitians at the end of 2014. The films allow Haitians to report on their country’s social and economic development 5 years after the devastating earthquake.

Michael is a filmmaker and educator whose documentary films address issues of social and economic development and the tipping point between order and chaos.

Tuesday, July 7, 12:00-1:00
The Foundry, 17 Oval Way, London SE11 5RR

0

Brighton, England-The Messenger is the Message

idslogo

 

The Messenger is the Message

Michael Sheridan will speak at the Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, England, (July 2, 13:00-14:30) about his work to put Afghans and Haitians in charge of the storytelling about their community’s economic and social development issues.

Michael went to Afghanistan in 2009 to make a documentary on effective development from the perspective of Afghan villagers. He trained Afghan women and men in lived-reality documentary filmmaking and they produced ten short films that provide a unique view of Afghans’ daily efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions. Community Supported Film completed a similar project with Haitians at the end of 2014. The films allow Haitians to report on their country’s social and economic development 5 years after the devastating earthquake.

Michael is a filmmaker and educator whose documentary films address issues of social and economic development and the tipping point between order and chaos.

Thursday, July 2, 13.00-14.30
Institute of Development Studies
Room 221, University of Sussex, Brighton

Tuesday, July 7, 12:00-13:00
The Foundry, 17 Oval Way, London SE11 5RR

0

Owning Our Future- Haitian Perspective films accepted into Jamaican film festival

Owning Our Future films ‘Ghetto Green, Ghetto Clean,’ ‘Threading the Needle’ & ‘Brave The World’ accepted into this year’s GATFFEST Film Festival, June 25-28, Kingston and Montego Bay, Jamaica.  

GATFFEST 2015

On Friday, the Centre for Tourism and Policy Research of the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, launched the Greater August Town Film Festival (GATFFEST) 2015 at its Western Jamaica Campus (WJC) in Montego Bay, St James. The film festival is to be held from June 25-28 jointly in Montego Bay and Kingston.

Dubbed “the biggest community film festival in the Caribbean” GATFFEST, which was initiated in 2012 in August Town, St Andrew, serves as a platform to showcase films produced by underserved communities participating in the UWI’s Community Film Project.

Activities during the four-day event include film workshops and screening of local, regional and international short films, along with an awards ceremony. June 26 is slated as Film Day in Montego Bay.

Diverse Cultures

Ian Boxill, professor of management studies and director, Centre for Tourism and Policy Research, indicated that 72 film submissions have been received so far from inside and outside Jamaica. The entries reflect not only the diverse cultures of and entertainment fare from those countries, but their way of life.

“We have a wide cross sections of films from drama to animation, comedy, sci-fi, documentaries … . It is really diverse. Films have been submitted from all continents except Africa , so we have a good variety,” said Professor Boxill.

He expressed optimism that just over 20 students from western Jamaica will be trained in filmmaking at the WJC in the upcoming school year.

Kadeem Wilson, GATFFEST brand ambassador and who plays a central role in the feature film Ghett-a-Life , said while persons such as Usain Bolt and Tessanne Chin have helped the world to be in tune with Brand Jamaica, the principals in the filmmaking industry keep “missing the boat”.

“There are so many projects, film projects, that we have missed the boat so many times in getting it to be shot on Jamaican soil. For example Home Again, which is an entirely Jamaican script and entirely Jamaican, but it was not shot here. It was shot in Trinidad and Tobago. So you understand the concern, the concern is that so many times you have a major project that is authentically Jamaican, it is not being shot here, ” said Wilson.

He said local film industry stakeholders need to bring in experts from overseas to give them insight on how to develop the Hollywood look, improving the cinematography and audio. Wilson said that GATFFEST is a move in the right direction.

“I am very proud of GATTFEST and very happy to be a part of this initiative. It has really shown us that we need to come together and hold our industry in our hand and walk with it and get everyone engaged and involved,” said Wilson.

Acting director of UWI, WJC, Patrick Prendergast, said the community film project has provided the campus with another opportunity to develop the region’s intellectual capacity and empower the youth.

“We are always very delighted to be part of these events. Certainly it helps us to move closer and deeper into these communities,” he said.

0

Haitian Film Screening & Discussion, June 19, Cambridge, MA

Fri Jun 19, 2015, 7pm, Free
Mobius, 55 Norfolk Street, Cambridge, MA 02139

CSFilm founder and director Michael Sheridan will present a screening of Owning Our Future – Haitian Perspectives in Film and will discuss how stories told by Haitians themselves can augment our understanding of Haiti’s post-earthquake relief efforts and provide a chance for us to experience Haiti as it is lived by Haitian street vendors, business women, artists, and farmers.

In 2014, Community Supported Film(CSFilm) conducted an intensive 5-week training of 10 Haitian women and men in documentary production. A collection of ten remarkable short films, Owning Our Future – Haitian Perspectives in Film (csfilm.org/films/haitian-perspectives-in-film), was produced during the training.

Going beyond disaster reporting, these films will ensure the experiences and points of view of Haitians are included in the international conversation about what has and has not happened since the 2010 7.0 earthquake – one of the world’s worst disasters. The films will also be used to increase dialogue and influence public policy internationally and in Haiti regarding effective foreign aid and sustainable development.

In a climate where mainstream American media typically reports international news from an American perspective with a focus on disaster and crisis, Community Supported Film (CSFilm) believes that local stories help us to better understand foreign events, diverse cultures and people’s complex realities.

Inspired by the model of Community Supported Agriculture, Community Supported Film applies the principle of investing in people on the ground by supporting the creation of locally-produced films. The resulting products help nourish a deeper understanding of the world that isn’t available in the mainstream media marketplace.

Page 1 of 512345